Tips to get an idea AND fruit action and success

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How to get an idea? 

  • Don’t tell yourself you can’t come up with an idea. Do you think ideas are only to be made by someone else? If so, please visit this thought you have and change it into one that tells yourself you’re fully capable of coming up with an idea and 100% on your own if you choose. You’re smart. You’re worthy. And you’ve got what it takes to come up with an amazing idea. Don’t second-guess yourself or think you can’t… EVER. 
  • Be curious. Learn as much as you can. The world and our lives are our artist’s pallet and playground for our idea formation. 
  • What are you doing and seeing right now or hear others doing or seeing? –  how does this relate in similarity or differences to something you or they have done before or are doing? Getting an idea is grounded in being able to notice things and relate those things to ours or someone we know’s past, something they or you said, and/or things we’ve learned. 
  • Think. Plain and simple. Take time to yourself to think. Step away from people or yourself talking or doing things, and sit down and think about the world and yours and others lives. If you never give yourself a single second or minute or hour to yourself, and you’ve allowed yourself to be in constant action, you may not be able to think clearly or easily. Idea formation comes from 1) Doing, seeing, and noticing things & 2) Giving ourselves time to process things and think.  

Have your idea, now what?…. How to fruit action and success.  

  • Write it down. Get it on paper.  I do think the act of writing something down on physical paper does something that electronic devices or methods can’t. I think it embeds it in your mind in a beautiful way that no other method can and allows it to bloom easier and quicker. I don’t care how pretty it reads or looks. Write it down. However, if you can’t write it down on paper or would rather not for any reason, still get it out of your head someplace whether you do this electrically, on paper, or record yourself saying your idea. 
  • Protect it. Don’t dismiss it by telling yourself now that you have it that it’s awful and waste of time and space. DO NOT just toss it like garbage. You came up with an idea for a reason, usually. If you’re a person that would toss your idea or down-it in any way, shape, or form from telling other people and hearing their reactions or criticism, then keep it to yourself. I don’t recommend telling anyone or possibly just a few people you trust is ok, but I wouldn’t tell a bunch of people. This can easily cloud our positive state we’re in when we first get an idea. 
  • Give yourself time to think about your idea more. Make a schedule for yourself to sit and think. Whether that’s just 5 minutes a week or an hour or more a week, set time aside to think about your idea more. This is the difference between getting an idea and then it dying from not going further and fruiting action and success. This is crucial. You need an action plan and time to think to move the needle with your idea. 

Do and ask yourself the following (Again, I recommend you write these down on paper.): 

  • Think of 1 thing to do to take action on your idea and do it immediately (or at least within the 1st week of getting your idea). Wait no longer on this. You need to do at least 1 thing. Get something rolling. This is the difference between people who come up with ideas and those who come up with ideas AND fruit action and success. They don’t wait. They don’t think about things for too long before they make an action. They think about 1 thing they can do first and they do it (within the first week). The rest can come later after you do this one thing. I promise you, this is one of the keys to fruit action and success. 

Do 1 thing to take action now!

Now that you’ve done your 1 thing to take action on your idea… (Please, don’t skip this before you do the steps below!)

Ok, you’re ready now that you’ve done your 1 thing…. 🙂 

  • What are 3 other things I can do to take action on my idea this week?
  • What people do I need to help me with taking action? 
  • What things or resources do I need to help me with taking action? 
  • Collect all of these thoughts and action steps from above onto paper or electronically if you haven’t already and revisit them often. Don’t just think or do these things and toss it into the closet after a week or weeks or never revisit them. Keep going back to your thoughts and action plans and refine them, add to them, and keep this process going each and every week until you’ve fruited action and success. Do this for yourself. 

Remember: 

You’re smart. You’re worthy. And you’ve got what it takes. Don’t second-guess yourself or think you can’t… EVER. You need this mentality, positive thought, and belief about yourself to get an idea AND fruit action and success. Don’t lose this, or you likely will not succeed. Ideas and fruiting action and success with them is a mental process as much as it is anything else. This part of it is sooooo easy to not do and get yourself off course or stop you from success. You need to keep telling yourself this and believe it. Believe your idea is good and visualize yourself fruiting action and being successful with your idea. It does so much to help you. Believe me, you got this! 🙂 

Favorite Sites

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Photo by Nick Morrison on Unsplash

Dear Readers,

I used to have these sites in a list on the right side of the blog. However, I recently reorganized and remodeled the Life Has Beautiful Learning Blog site. So, Im sharing all my most favorite sites in this post and I’ll continue to update this post with more sites with time.

I hope you enjoy them as much as I have. Each one has given me endless inspiration for the blog and in many other life pursuits.

I invite you to share your favorite sites that may not be listed in this post in the comments. This will create great information sharing for all readers.

Have a great weekend!

Sincerely,

Aleesa

A Healthy Slice of Life

Becoming Minimalist

Candice Kumai

Christopher Conners

Darius Foroux

Extra Petite

Felines of New York

Frugalwoods

Healthy Glow

How to be Chic

Humans of New York

Inspired By Charm

Introvert, Dear

Little Black Journal

Live Simply

Medium.com

Minimal Wellness

My French Country Home

Niklas Goeke

No Side Bar

Pretty, Young & Motivated

Rae Dunn

The Art of Simple

The Minimalists

The Simply Luxurious Life

Tim Denning

Wendy Mak

With Love From Kat

Fix the Broken Things in Our Lives…

Photo by Todd Quackenbush on Unsplash

I have an awful habit of not staying on-top of fixing things that are broken in my house and car. I guess it’s because I think I have a higher tolerance for chaos in my life than average (because it doesn’t seem to bother me to leave things but hey maybe it is bothering me in ways I didn’t realize!) and well… I’m lazy. I’ll admit it, i’m so lazy when it comes to some things in my life. I have no care at times for some things.

Last weekend, I took it upon myself to go around my home and car and fix anything I could. Just one day out of the weekend, actually. I did this after months and months of letting things go broken by doing the following steps:

  1. I told myself… no more. I will not live like this.
  2. I put it on my Google calendar that I’d fix things.
  3. I followed through even though I didn’t want to do ANY OF IT. It was a chore. It wasn’t fun. It wasn’t grand. It felt like the worst work on the planet. ha!

HOWEVER, AFTER I fixed those broken things last weekend…. I felt accomplishment, I felt joy, and I felt happiness in a way I hadn’t felt for a long time. AND, something else happened…

My other problems in my life that were not physically broken things seemed to feel less like problems and seemed totally more manageable or less of an issue than they were before.

So, I share this because if this can have that kind of power for me, then I think it may for you too.

Maybe we start out small (I love my own advice!…. I totally need to practice what I’m preaching here too. ha!), and we fix just one little broken thing in our lives right away or even better… the minute it’s broken – don’t even let it sit. The effects of fixing that one little thing could quadruple and spill over into fixing more than you’d ever imagined.

Let’s fix the broken things in our lives.

Lessons from my MBA… the kind that are personal and are not taught from a book.

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My MBA taught me that I need an outlet such as writing or communication with someone I trust (often that’s myself or my good friends) to get the best understanding of myself and the situations I’m presented with.

The team-focus in my MBA and all the writing I did for it helped me to see this about myself. I never knew it until my MBA.

It taught me also that I absolutely love reading. I never read for fun until my MBA… it was reading those Harvard Business Review cases that I grew a fond love for reading, ironically. A lot of people laugh at this when I tell them…

They say, “You grew a passion for reading from HBR Articles? – You’re nuts! haha!”

My classes showed me that I am smarter and more reflective than I ever imagined. My self-confidence grew, and I now understand a lot more about myself than I did with my undergraduate degree alone.

I also noticed that I had a lot to contribute to my MBA teams and classes because I typically have ideas and/or input that is different from maybe what everyone else thinks. Or, maybe I am brave enough to say my thoughts whereas others hold in what they feel if it opposes the mainstream thought.

My MBA helped me to find my own voice.

Overall, my MBA helped me dramatically with my own personal growth.

And it’s still and will always be a work-in-progress. This I learned from MBA too… I thought I knew so much more before my MBA.

My MBA humbled me – it let me see the endless things that I didn’t know, and that there’s infinite things to learn in this world.

It was far more than the lessons you learn from a book or being in class. It was a very personal journey.

The Time I was Trying to be and do Everything with Everyone… And Power of Saying “No”.

Photo by nikko macaspac on Unsplash

It was my junior year of college and I was involved in everything, working a lot, had my first upper level business classes, and decided to live in the freshman dorm hall because it was cheaper. I found I ended up with horrible grades, and I nearly failed one of my classes.

I had a roommate that took over the whole entire room with her never-ending things she had and upstairs neighbors that played music so loud that my dorm room shook. The next semester of my junior year I realized I needed to make some significant changes otherwise I was going to not do so hot in my college career and might go insane!

So, I took away all of the commitments that were serving me no true value or purpose by taking a closer look at what I really wanted and needed. I moved to another dorm room where I had my own room that enforced quiet hours in an upper classmen residence hall.

I could breathe again, and soon my sanity came back.

I realized from all of this that I needed to learn to be more selective with what I did with my time, who I was around, and again that my environment I was in either was demotivating or motivating.

Everything seemed to go to heck that first semester, but it all fell into place again once I made some hard decisions to get back to what I needed.

The High-School Awards Ceremony I never forgot…

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This writing was another reflection exercise I did for one of my MBA Leadership Classes.

This class was so profound for me in my MBA. It helped me to learn sooo much about myself and how my life experiences have affected me and thus in-turn as a leader.

……

It was at an end of the year awards ceremony in high school that I realized I was at the top of my class and I was different.

That year each teacher gave out top three students in their class awards as well as top 10 for each subject. I found out that I was in the top 3 for every one of my classes and top 3 in my entire class. This was in about 9th grade this occurred. I
found that I was 3rd performing in my class at that point.

I didn’t know this until that exact point. I just simply did my work and didn’t care that I was performing well.

It started with a few awards, and then after about 4 trips up to the podium in front of the entire high school I started to realize that this was both eye-opening, but also I felt sad. My classmates soon realized that I was standing up for nearly every award there was given to be a recipient, and they all started guessing that I was going to be called ahead of time. They did this with all of the 3 of us or so that had numerous awards. They seemed upset that we kept getting the awards and they didn’t.

I was picked on afterwards about the awards. They said I didn’t deserve them and that I was just “Miss Smartypants” and that I needed to help them cheat on their homework because I had all of the right answers. Some of the people in my class actually did help them to cheat and they played up the attention while I again got frustrated by everyone and I thought of myself as different for not allowing myself to help my classmates cheat. I offered them the chance for me to teach them, but they didn’t want it. They went to those that would simply give them the answers.

It wasn’t until this awards ceremony and the aftermath that I realized I felt and was different from my classmates in many regards. I went home that night of the awards ceremony with about 10 awards total. I felt sad because I wanted everyone else to be able to feel a sense of achievement and recognition like I had at the ceremony. I felt sad for them that they had to watch me come to the podeum again and again and I felt their pain.

I felt so many emotions for the people out in the crowd watching me again get an award, and what was worse was that to me the awards really didn’t mean anything. To me,
they were paper and I didn’t like the attention that came with getting an award.

I didn’t want everyone to think of me as “Miss Smartypants”.

I wanted them to see past this and look at me as good friend or a caring person.

The Change of Friends in 7th Grade…

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This writing was also a reflection exercise I did for one of my MBA Leadership Classes.

This class was so profound for me in my MBA. It helped me to learn sooo much about myself and how my life experiences have affected me and thus in-turn as a leader.

……

I mostly have been a person to stick with a close set of friends valuing quality over quantity of friendships. When I find someone that I really like to spend time with and talk to, I really hone in a lot of what makes them unique and yet I am able to see their weaknesses.

I had a friend from 3rd grade till 7th grade that was my sole friend. I didn’t see any need to make more friends; she was all I needed for socialization. I did everything with her and I really put a lot of value on our friendship. We were two peas in a pod.

It was great, but over the years as we got older I realized more and more that while she was a great friend she also was discouraging to me and almost held me back from being my best self. I noticed weaknesses in her that I hated over time.

In about the 6th grade, we started to really like the boys…. We would talk about the different men we liked and about our classmates. What I found was that I was actually very brave and curious about everyone while she was shy and talked as though she was afraid of everyone and everything. I was still her friend, but I would suggest we sit with other people at lunch or maybe we could do something that was kind of crazy but could be fun! She resisted. She didn’t want to do anything out of fear for what people would think and she didn’t want to eat lunch with anyone else.

Eventually, I started to feel trapped being her friend even though I clearly could have just went and did the things alone without her. One day it all came to an end, but by my actions. I told her that I was going to eat lunch with my friend I was making in my band class and she was free to come, but I wasn’t going to sit with her anymore and maybe even be her friend. I told her what I thought about her, and she was upset.

We grew apart and I made new friends. Of course, I noticed the same things with my new friends. They were fearful of others and never were curious about other people who they had their negative views of. I wanted to talk to everyone and get to know everyone. I soon felt different and as though my thoughts weren’t appropriate because nobody seemed to be like me.

I showed my bravery and curiosity in other ways though. Sports was one. In sports, I was able to play with multiple of people instead of sticking to the group of friends I was around all of the time. I talked to anyone when I would talk, but I didn’t talk too much in high school. Band was also my outlet. There were in my opinion no social norms in band, I could talk with everyone there about band because we shared that interest. So, I did. I tried to not be distant from anyone in band and I was most myself there than any other place.

Therefore, I found from this experience that I need to feel free and allow my bravery and curiosity to show. I also learned that the environment and again people I’m around has an influence on how I allow myself to be. I find that I cannot be around closed-minded people for too long, otherwise, it internally bothers me or I begin to inhibit their characteristics instead of acting as my true self.